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Read an eBook Week: What's it about? (cross-posted)

Posted by mdbenoit on 2009.03.03 at 06:50
Every year for the past five years, around the beginning of March, eBooks are celebrated and promoted through Read an eBook Week. This year it is from March 8th to 14th. But what is it about?

Read an eBook week was first registered with Chase's Calendar of events in 2004. “Read an EBook Week is a not-for-profit week set aside to inform the public about the pleasures and advantages of reading electronically. Authors, publishers, vendors, the media and readers world-wide […] join in the effort.” (http://ebookweek.com). During that week, publishers and authors offer specials (such as free eBooks) to entice the readers to try them. If you've never tried an eBook and have been intrigued by them, be sure to check the Read an eBook Week partners' page (http://ebookweek.com/partners.html) for some good deals.



EBooks have been around for a long time but readers have been slow in accepting this medium, especially in North America. “There's nothing like a feel of a book in my hand,” readers say. What proponents of eBooks reply to that is that the eBook is not meant to replace paper books; it is another medium for books, in the same way as audio books are. EBooks are cheaper, they reduce our carbon footprint by minimizing the use of paper, glues, etc., and take very little space. Greg Kozak “found that a paper book created 4 times the greenhouse gas emissions of an e-book reader and several times more ozone-depleting substances and chemicals associated with acid rain. Print books needed 3 times more raw materials and 78 times more water consumption than e-books.” (http://ebookweek.com/environment.html). One of the most important features of eBooks is that, because they are in electronic format, they never go out of print. And now with the new reading devices available on the market, the reading experience is as satisfying as reading on paper.

In great part because of those improved reading devices, big publishers have begun offering their new titles as eBooks at the same time as the paper book, and in some cases, before the print version comes out.

The Read an eBook Week website (http://ebookweek.com) also contains information about the history of eBooks, descriptions and reviews of various reading devices, as well as links to various eBook sellers. Even if eBooks are not for you, don't you want to know what all the buzz is about?

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