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Every year for the past five years, around the beginning of March, eBooks are celebrated and promoted through Read an eBook Week. This year it is from March 8th to 14th. But what is it about?

Read an eBook week was first registered with Chase's Calendar of events in 2004. “Read an EBook Week is a not-for-profit week set aside to inform the public about the pleasures and advantages of reading electronically. Authors, publishers, vendors, the media and readers world-wide […] join in the effort.” (http://ebookweek.com). During that week, publishers and authors offer specials (such as free eBooks) to entice the readers to try them. If you've never tried an eBook and have been intrigued by them, be sure to check the Read an eBook Week partners' page (http://ebookweek.com/partners.html) for some good deals.



EBooks have been around for a long time but readers have been slow in accepting this medium, especially in North America. “There's nothing like a feel of a book in my hand,” readers say. What proponents of eBooks reply to that is that the eBook is not meant to replace paper books; it is another medium for books, in the same way as audio books are. EBooks are cheaper, they reduce our carbon footprint by minimizing the use of paper, glues, etc., and take very little space. Greg Kozak “found that a paper book created 4 times the greenhouse gas emissions of an e-book reader and several times more ozone-depleting substances and chemicals associated with acid rain. Print books needed 3 times more raw materials and 78 times more water consumption than e-books.” (http://ebookweek.com/environment.html). One of the most important features of eBooks is that, because they are in electronic format, they never go out of print. And now with the new reading devices available on the market, the reading experience is as satisfying as reading on paper.

In great part because of those improved reading devices, big publishers have begun offering their new titles as eBooks at the same time as the paper book, and in some cases, before the print version comes out.

The Read an eBook Week website (http://ebookweek.com) also contains information about the history of eBooks, descriptions and reviews of various reading devices, as well as links to various eBook sellers. Even if eBooks are not for you, don't you want to know what all the buzz is about?

stock - darth kittius

Wrinkle Comments

Posted by darth_kittius on 2007.11.13 at 11:36
I re-read A Wrinkle in Time just last year and yet I really saw a lot more in it on this re-read. Maybe it's because I was reading it for a book group where I know I would want to discuss it, or maybe I just examined it from a different angle. Regardless, I have very mixed feelings about what I think but I do see what it's such a classic and I do think everyone (especially those around middle school age) should read it as there are some very valuable lessons contained within.

cut for those still readingCollapse )

FN: Bubbles

Book for November

Posted by kiwiria on 2007.10.15 at 14:31
A Wrinkle in Time lead the poll, so let's get hold of it, and start discussing it. Feel free to post whenever, but until November 1st, please put spoilers under a cut.

I've only read this book once before, and that was 10 years ago, so I'm really looking forward to rereading it!

Books: Goes off in search

Book poll!

Posted by kiwiria on 2007.10.09 at 22:42
Please vote for our next book to read and discuss! NB I forgot to make voting friends only, so if you've voted but haven't joined the community, your vote won't be counted, so hurry up and join! :-D

Pick your top three. Poll will be open for at least a week. Longer if necessary.

Pick our next book! Max 3 choices

The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
0(0.0%)
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo
0(0.0%)
Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier
0(0.0%)
The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin
0(0.0%)
Abundance: A Novel of Marie Antoinette by Sena Jeter Naslund
0(0.0%)
The Septembers of Shiraz by Dalia Sofer
0(0.0%)
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
1(5.6%)
The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly
0(0.0%)
The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova
0(0.0%)
The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
0(0.0%)
A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine L'Engle
1(5.6%)
The Dark Is Rising by Susan Cooper
1(5.6%)
The Stand by Stephen King
0(0.0%)
April Fool's Day by Bryce Courtenay
0(0.0%)
Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman
0(0.0%)

Books: Drug of choice

It's that time again...

Posted by kiwiria on 2007.10.02 at 14:33
Post your suggestions for the next book for us to read, and I'll make a poll by next Monday. aurillia I have yours from last time :)


Wandering

Stardust

Posted by aurillia on 2007.08.30 at 15:15


I'll be honest: the only reason I read this was because it was voted as the September book. I didn't vote for it, but I'm always happy to read a book I wouldn't otherwise have picked up. Lots of people on the Lj book communities have recommended Gaiman, and others weren't too impressed. I find I've fallen into the second category, and I still don't feel inclined to read anything else by him.

The movie's out at the moment, and a preview I saw at the cinema was the first time I'd even heard of this book - I guessed it was a book, since adaptations of fantasy books is very popular at the mo. I saw loads of ads for it before I read the book, and have to say, first off, that there seem to be few similarities.

Tristran Thorn is the son of Dunston Thorn and a woman-cat-person-thing from Faery, which lies beyond the wall which gave the village of Wall, in England, it's name. There's a gap in the wall, which they take turns to guard, to stop people from going through into Faery. Every 7 years there's a market held in the meadow beyond the wall, the only time the villagers go through the gap.

While trying to woo beautiful Victoria Forester, Tristran promises to bring back the star they just watched fall over the mountains in Faery. So begins his journey to find the star, which, because it fell in Faery, is not a lump of rock but an equally beautiful young woman with a bit of a temper.

Also looking for the star, called Yvain, are three sister witches who use the heart of the star to give themselves youth and beauty; and the sons of the 81st Lord of Stormhold, who threw his amulet at the star which is what made it fall in the first place. Because he has three remaining sons when he dies (they had already killed the other four), the one who gets the topaz stone back will become the 82nd Lord of Stormhold.

Naturally, Faery is populated by all sorts of creatures, including sinister woods, hairy little men, unicorns, the usual. And because Tristran is half-Faery himself, he fits right in.

Stardust is written with a light touch by British-born and raised Gaiman (now US resident), that reminded me - as it was probably meant to - of Douglas Adams and William Golding (Princess Bride), but the humour, the wit, the irony, isn't really there. The tone and style and pacing makes you expect more than it delivers. It's called an "adult fairy tale", but I don't think including a weak, rather embarrassing sex scene and several references to relieving yourself make it adult, and I didn't find it particularly insightful or allegorical. The ending is rather unsatisfying, being anticlimactic, long-winded and dull. 

The quality of the writing didn't strike me as very inspiring. It's very "this happened then this then this", almost a kind of pain-by-numbers. And predictable, very predictable.

Maybe I'm missing something. I know there's a lot of people who will totally disagree with me, but, for me, it was too lacking in so many areas. I don't think reading the original, graphic-illustrated version would improve things much, since it's the quality of the story itself that I'm disappointed with. 

X-posted to  epicfantasyand bookshare

FN: Bubbles

Stardust

Posted by kiwiria on 2007.08.30 at 20:55
I just finished the book, so thought I'd kick this off. Please people, don't be shy. The more posts the merrier! :-D

"Stardust" is only the second Neil Gaiman book I've read. The first was "American Gods" which I was really, really, REALLY unimpressed by. However, dichroic spoke warmly of it, and as I usually share taste in books with her, I figured it couldn't be all bad ;) I don't know when I'd have gotten around to reading it if we hadn't chosen it here though, so I'm glad we did.

What struck me most about "Stardust" is that while it's categorised as a fantasy book, I wouldn't consider it fantasy in the same way as books by say... J.K. Rowling, Tamora Pierce or even C. S. Lewis. I'd rather compare it to the old-fashioned fairy tales as told by the brothers Grimm and people of their ilk. We used to do a LOT of analyzing of fairy tales in school (I live in the country of H.C. Andersen - how could we not?! ;) ), and "Stardust" contains practically ALL the elements. I'm not saying that that's a bad thing, but because if it typically being mentioned in the same breath as "The Golden Compass", "Harry Potter" and "A Winkle in Time", I'd just expected something different.

I loved all the details in it. Everything turned out to be of some importance later on in the story. I'm really impressed when an author can pull that off!

All in all I guess I need to give Neil Gaiman another chance... right now he's at 50-50 ;-)

FN: Bubbles

Stardust it is!

Posted by kiwiria on 2007.08.13 at 09:38
"Stardust" by Neil Gaiman won by a landslide - fitting since the movie is out :)

Let's use the rest of this month to get hold of the book, and then start discussing it in September. Feel free to post opinions at any time though, but if you do so before September 1st, please use spoiler warnings where appropriate.

You're also always welcome to comment on other books you're reading, if you have a topic you'd like to put up for discussion :)

Off to check whether my local library has the book, or if I should buy it while in London ;)

FN: Bubbles

Book poll!

Posted by kiwiria on 2007.08.06 at 09:20
Hi all :) Only five books were suggested, so I'm using radiobuttons rather than checkboxes this time. I'll leave the poll open until next Monday.

Poll #1034174 What book should we read next?

What book should we read next?

"Stardust" by Neil Gaiman
6(60.0%)
"Twilight" by Stephenie Meyer
2(20.0%)
"These Happy Golden Years" by Laura Ingalls Wilder
0(0.0%)
"The Rosary" by Florence L. Barclay
2(20.0%)
"Out of the Silent Planet" by C.S. Lewis
0(0.0%)

Is there any of the above books that you really DON'T want to read?

Do you have any suggestions for books that ought to go on the next poll?



Please vote :-D

Wandering

Book Suggestions

Posted by aurillia on 2007.08.02 at 11:48
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo
Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier
The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin


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